content tagged as Public Policy, Food Laws & Regulations

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Although nutrition labeling compliance dates have been delayed, food companies should not underestimate the time required to revise nutrition labeling.

Speakers address the perception that food processing affects the healthfulness of foods.
A new definition for dietary fiber has jurisdictions talking and food companies scrambling.
Key food and beverage regulations may be affected by new administration policies.
This session explores the new FSVP requirements that importers are required to perform. It will highlight the risk-based activities needed to verify that food imported into the United States have been produced in a manner that meets applicable U.S. safety standards. Attendees will hear the perspectives on this matter from former FDA Officials (Center Director and District Director) as well as food executives representing US importers and foreign food technologists who assist foreign firms with FSVP compliance for U.S bound imports. These food safety experts are now prominent consultants, legal experts, industry leaders and academics working globally to help firms meet these new requirements.

The speakers will report on the progress of FSVP made to date and provide new applicable and practical information on the final FSVP rule and its role from the perspective of FDA, domestic food manufacturers, foreign food importers, all of which have to address the FSMA preventive control requirements, including transportation of goods through the production lifecycle. This is a must session to attend for all importers of foods or domestic firms purchasing foods from foreign sources. It will be particularly beneficial to those who have not yet taken this aspect of FSMA seriously, or understand the consequences of lack of compliance. FSMA is an enormous undertaking and a presents a major change in how food safety is controlled in the United States. Are you ready?

*NOTE: This Short Course begins on Friday, 6/23/17 at 1:00 PM. The new federal regulations coming out of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) require that all companies producing food (not currently under regulatory-required HACCP) have a written Food Safety Plan as well as a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) to create, implement and oversee that Food Safety Plan. This two-and-a-half-day short course will satisfy both requirements to comply with the Hazard Analysis and Risk-based Preventive Controls for Human Foods rule. You will gain the knowledge needed to create a Food Safety Plan and meet the FDA’s training requirement to become your company’s PCQI. The course provides advice from industry professionals, hands-on group activity sessions and documentation to help you develop and implement a preventive controls Food Safety Plan. Medium-sized companies will need to be in compliance with the preventive controls rules by the Fall of 2017. Get started now to ensure that you are ready!

Designed by the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA), this is the FDA recognized course for training food and beverage industry professionals seeking to become PCQI.

REGISTRATION: http://iftevent.org/register/registration

IFT Members: $865
Non-Members: $1,050
Student Members: $350
All rates to increase $100 after May 12, 2017.
Course registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, afternoon beverages, training workbook, and certificate designating you as a PCQI upon successful completion of the exam at the end of the course.

When it comes to food labels, consumers are looking for clean labels and simple ingredients they can find in their kitchens. Synthetic preservatives and artificial flavors and colors are strictly prohibited in organic food production, and only a limited number of synthetic ingredients and processing aids are allowed. When a natural or organic alternative to an allowed synthetic material becomes commercially available, there is a process in place to remove the synthetic ingredient from the list of substances allowed in organic production. This process keeps the USDA Organic label strong in the eyes of the consumer, while creating abundant opportunities for innovative ingredient producers. In this session, hosted by the Organic Trade Association, participants will hear from a variety of experts, including a researcher/scientist, the chief flavorist at a leading organic flavorings house, a company that utilizes organic flavorings, and an entrepreneur whose company successfully petitioned for a use restriction on the allowance of silicone dioxide in organic products by demonstrating that his company’s ingredient was an effective organic alternative. Attendees will learn about several regulatory changes to the USDA organic regulations that are quickly approaching on the use of natural flavors, colors, carrageenan, and celery powder, and participants will gain an appreciation of the market opportunity available for food technologists who specialize in creating organic and natural alternatives. Attendees will also be provided with a step-by-step model for developing organic and natural ingredients for use in organic products.
In May 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released the final rule to update the iconic Nutrition Facts label in order to reflect the evolution of nutrition science over the past two decades. Most manufacturers and brand owners will need to implement the new label by July 26, 2018. Several items, including the labeling of serving sizes, added sugar, and Daily Values for certain key nutrients will change based on the final rule. These changes will not only impact retail products and CPG companies but also the food-service sector and related companies. Additionally, the FDA is now enforcing the Menu Labeling Final Rule, which requires restaurants and similar retail food establishments to provide calorie and other nutrition information for standard menu items, including food on display and self-service food. At this symposium, experts from various fields (e.g. CPG, food service, or nonprofit organization) will discuss what these nutrition-labeling changes mean to the retail and food service sectors of the food industry. Topics to be discussed include changes to serving sizes, which may have implications for nutrient content claims, changes in the Daily Values for nutrients like fat and some vitamins and minerals, and the addition of added sugars to the label. This presentation will highlight what to calculate and document—not just graphically reformat. For restaurant-menu labeling, we’ll discuss requirements of the regulation and implications for restaurants including collecting and managing records of nutritional analysis; revising, replacing and updating menus/menu boards; employee training; legal review; and recipe development. The impact of these changes on the dairy foods category will also be discussed. While some of these modifications may have a beneficial or neutral effect, other changes will have major implications for how the industry is able to talk about the nutrient contributions of foods to the diet. These topics will be helpful to the product developers as well as professionals working in nutrition, regulatory, marketing, and packaging. Navigating the nutrition labeling waters is a primer for all packaged goods owners including importers and food service operators.
The decades-old advice to limit fat in the diet has not only been overturned by the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans, but will now be further underscored by a review of the term “healthy” as the FDA seeks to modernize regulations for nutrition-related labeling claims. In this session, Dr. Peter Jones, Director of the Richardson Centre of Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals at the University of Manitoba, will discuss the current evidence that links various fatty acids with the major chronic diseases. Emerging science is starting to clarify the beneficial and essential role that unsaturated fats play in healthy diets. Some of the newest science is focusing particularly on monounsaturated fats that appear to have multiple benefits beyond the typical lipid-lowering endpoints usually measured when discussing the role of fats in the diet. Dr. Penny Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition at Penn State University, and lipid expert on numerous policy boards ranging from the US Dietary Guidelines to the American Heart Association, will discuss the latest science and how it is being interpreted and translated into public policy and new labeling regulations. This includes the implied nutrient content claim “healthy.” David Dzisiak, oils leader for Dow AgroSciences, will delve into the latest consumer demand for clean labels and products that are “free from” additives or unknown ingredients. This challenges our industry to innovate in such a way that a package of attributes can be delivered that includes taste, function, health, shelf life, and sustainability when possible. The concept of “healthy” is about to take on a multi-faceted meaning as researchers and regulators redefine the term. The discussion of these issues in this session will provide industry with greater insight as they develop new, healthier food products to meet consumer expectations.
The new federal regulations coming out of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) require that all companies producing food (not currently under regulatory-required HACCP) have a written Food Safety Plan as well as a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) to create, implement and oversee that Food Safety Plan. This two-and-a-half-day short course will satisfy both requirements to comply with the Hazard Analysis and Risk-based Preventive Controls for Human Foods rule. You will gain the knowledge needed to create a Food Safety Plan and meet the FDA’s training requirement to become your company’s PCQI. The course provides advice from industry professionals, hands-on group activity sessions and documentation to help you develop and implement a preventive controls Food Safety Plan. Medium-sized companies will need to be in compliance with the preventive controls rules by the Fall of 2017. Get started now to ensure that you are ready!

Designed by the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA), this is the FDA recognized course for training food and beverage industry professionals seeking to become PCQI.

REGISTRATION: http://iftevent.org/register/registration

IFT Members: $965
Non-Members: $1,150
Student Members: $450
Course registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, afternoon beverages, training workbook, and certificate designating you as a PCQI upon successful completion of the exam at the end of the course.