Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

content tagged as Symposium

1 - 10 Results out of 66
Hot Topics Session: Establishing a Regulatory Action Levels for Food Allergens--Do We Have the Data We Need?

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427ABC

Hot Topics Session: Proposition 65: What it Means for the Food Industry

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427ABC

Hot Topics Session: Say What? The Mandatory Paradigm Shift in Today's Science Communications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427ABC

Today, food is hot. People are interested in food as demonstrated by the number of food shows. The science of food is also hot. People are interested in food science (how their products are made), in nutrition (is it good or bad for them), in toxicology (is it really safe), in epidemiology (does food make us better, fatter, or what). People will ask questions and we in the food industry will get their questions. You will, too.

How do you communicate what's really scientifically right, and interesting? There are so many people who have important things to say but how do you say them? What do you say? What do you not say? What are real questions? What are trick, sensationalized questions?

And most of all, about YOU. How can you present important information to the press, to the law, to the public? How should you think about what you present? How should you conduct yourself? What should you embrace as an earnest inquiry into the truth, and what should you sense as sensationalism.

This session attempts to address these questions.
Challenges with New Product Development with Dairy Proteins and Alternatives to Dairy Proteins

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:10 AM - 11:10 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

This session will go through some of the challenges and properties with formulating new food products with dairy proteins and vegetable-based alternatives to dairy proteins.

*Our thanks to Axiom for their sponsorship of the Alternative Protein Deep Dive programming*
Recent Developments in Application of Membrane Filtration Technologies for Cheese and Beverage Manufacture

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

In recent years, membrane technologies have been widely used in the manufacture of various foods and beverage products. Per recent announcement from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), ultrafiltered (UF) milk will be permitted in the manufacture of Standard of Identity (SOI) cheeses. This opens-up very exciting opportunity for cheese manufacturers. This symposia will provide a platform to discuss a range of opportunities and challenges for application of membrane technologies in the cheese industry as well as in the wider food industry. The symposium will also cover the regulatory aspects of this technologies in various product categories.



*Our thanks to Naturex for their sponsorship of the Product Development & Ingredient Innovations track*
Physically Processed, Functional Carbohydrates as Food Ingredients

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

The demand for physically (i.e., non-chemically) modified, ingredients is increasing in the market due to consumer preference towards “healthy and natural” foods. Carbohydrate ingredients, such as starch, flour, hydrocolloids, sugars, and fibers play major roles in processed foods; to provide viscosity building, thickening, gelling, structure formation, ingredient binding, and certain other functions such as sensory attributes and nutritional value. Conventionally, chemical modifications have been used to modify carbohydrates to make ingredients with desired properties; process tolerance, improved stability, and in-product functionality. During past two decades, there has been an increased focus on physical modification technologies for making carbohydrate ingredients, particularly starch, due to increased demand for clean label ingredients by both the food manufacturers and consumers alike. Starch physical modifications have been limited, primarily, to treatments involving various heat-moisture combinations. Such technologies have been experimented and reviewed, in detail, in the scientific literature. New physical processing technologies, to obtain specific ingredient properties and functionalities, have emerged in the recent past. This symposium introduces and discusses recent advances in using physical processes available for developing functional carbohydrate ingredients.
Healthy Oils: The New Go-To Ingredient for Health and Function

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

A paradigm shift is occurring as global dietary guidance and regulatory action moves to encouraging optimal amounts of “good fats” in the diets of consumers. Quickly accumulating nutrition research is driving this trend and innovation throughout the food chain is making the development of new oil ingredients possible. This session will examine the latest science driving the trends on healthy oils, review the biggest regulatory and policy changes coming on fats and oils in over two decades, and delve into the innovations that will allow product developers to create healthier, tasty, functional products.

Dr. Cyril Kendall, an internationally respected researcher at the University of Toronto who specializes in healthy diet patterns, will discuss how an ever-growing body of nutrition research is showing that poly and monounsaturated fats should not only be used to replace trans and saturated fats in the diet, but how they also confer independent health benefits. Since dietary fats and oils constitute about one third of our daily calories, this is a significant development for the very large, and growing, population afflicted with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Public policy groups and regulatory agencies are in the process of implementing the first major update in over two decades of package labels. Patricia Kearney, President of PMK Associates, Inc. and former Chief of Staff of USDA, will address how FDA and USDA will integrate efforts on back of pack nutrition labels and GMO labeling, discuss which foods might use the claim “healthy,” and how a new structure for establishing the next Dietary Guidelines for Americans could affect product development in the future. The demand for healthy, functional and tasty products is on the rise. Innovative technologies using advanced breeding techniques and customized blends of new generation oils create functional ingredients that can help companies meet this demand. Christopher Nowlan, who as a senior oil products manager at Dow DuPont, Inc., is a food chain expert on areas from seed development to end use products. He will talk about the use of new techniques used to develop GMO and non-GMO seeds, traceability, new oil blends, and customized ingredients.
Whistleblower Protections Under FSMA: Food Industry and Legal Perspectives

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

As the FDA focuses on the development and implementation of food safety rules under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is responsible for implementation and enforcement of FSMA’s Whistleblower Protection Provision (FSMA Section 402). The FSMA Whistleblower Protection Provision “prohibits entities engaged in manufacturing, processing, packing, transporting, distributing, receiving, holding, or importing food from retaliating against employees for engaging in certain protected activities, including reporting alleged violations of the FD&C.” The protected activities may include “providing information relating to any violation of the FD&C or any act that he or she reasonably believed to be a violation of the FD&C to: − the employer, − the Federal Government, or − the attorney general of a state, testifying, assisting, or participating in a proceeding concerning a violation of the FD&C; or objecting to or refusing to participate in any activity that he or she reasonably believed to be in violation of the FD&C.” In contrast to the significant outreach efforts expended on the food safety rules in FSMA, section 402 is neither well known nor understood, and many questions remain. For example, is a food testing laboratory a covered entity? If an employee objects to “re-dating” or selling “expired” food products, does that constitute a protected activity?

Many IFT members are “employees” of food “entities” and serve as representatives for their employers in decision-making processes. This symposium is designed to help all attendees understand the Ins and Outs of FSMA whistleblower protection.
Characterizing Key Attributes of Various Proteins in Food Applications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 08:00 AM - 09:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

In recent years protein has become the most important and preferred ingredient by all consumer segments. According to a Food and Health survey conducted by the International Food Information Council (2016), protein tops the list of nutrients people want to consume. In the past two years there has been an increase of about 63% in new products with some kind of protein claim. Globally this number is even higher: approximately 85% (Inova 2017).

Proteins from various sources are increasingly available for application in various food products. Depending on its source, protein plays three major roles in food products: taste, nutrition, and functionality. More and more consumers are interested to learn about value of proteins derived from various sources. This symposium is being organized with the objective of characterizing various properties of proteins derived from different sources (e.g. milk, whey, pea, potato, soy, rice, etc.). Eminent subject experts will provide the latest updates on the research that is being conducted in this area.

*Our thanks to Axiom for their sponsorship of the Alternative Protein Deep Dive programming*
New Insights Into Using Photon Emission to Image Lipid Oxidation Patterns in Food Matrices

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

Existing techniques presently used for oxidation measurements remain either inaccurate and misleading or ill-adapted to different oxidation conditions. The method reported here addresses all of the above challenges. Plants, like almost all living organisms, spontaneously emit photons of visible light (autoluminescence). Such light is very faint and it mainly emanates from oxidized lipids. The visualization of such a weak light is possible only by using particular, yet fairly accessible pieces of imaging equipment, providing excellent sensitivity that is based on liquid N2-cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. This technique is called luminescence. Thus, here we will present that through a multidisciplinary approach, initially based on techniques used in astronomy, then in plant science, chemistry and biology, was necessary to advance our understanding in lipid oxidation.

Here, we used the knowledge and innovative methods gained via the above multidisciplinary approach to investigate lipid oxidation in food matrices. We intend to show through case studies that just like in plants, oxidation of food matrices abundant in fats can be imaged and mapped by luminescence. Indeed the audience will be provided examples of cases studies that this innovative, highly sensitive, non-invasive method we rapidly imaged lipid oxidation in aged oil in water emulsions.

This method was then used as a screening tool of a research program on plant antioxidants and addressed certain questions concerning plant compounds with high chelating and antioxidative capacities, capable of synergistical effects, and their modes of action and roles in planta and in food matrix. Here, we report on data that resulted from an investigation of a great number of extracts and extract combinations originating from different parts of edible plants and from an array of taxonomically and geographically distant species. We undertook different research phases that ranged from studies in vitro, through studies in food matrix (mayonnaise), extract/activity characterization phase, to understanding mechanisms of action. Our first focus concerned in vitro studies that screened numerous extracts/plant products obtained through various technologies, for their chelating and anti-reactive oxygen species (ROS) and -free radical activities. Selected extract candidates and extract combinations with demonstrated synergistical effects were then tested within mayonnaise. Subsequently, characterization of extracts of interest, and the identification of compounds conferring antioxidative and chelating activity were identified.

Finally, our research concerns the understanding of fundamental mechanisms according to which plant compounds may inhibit off-taste in fat-abundant food matrices provoked by oxidation, even at fairly low concentrations. We propose why in lipid dispersions such as mayonnaise the ability of reactants to move from a lipid particle to others is an important, yet often ignored, determinant of lipid oxidation and its inhibition by antioxidants. Three putative inter-particle transfer mechanisms will be suggested. Several proprietary extracts and extract combinations originating from different parts of edible plants and from taxonomically distant species that displayed antioxidative and notably chelating activities will be presented.